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Government & Industry Relations

PMRA Chlorothalonil (PSRD2022-01)

The consultation period has been extended. Interested parties are encouraged to provide comments and suggestions by 11 May 2022.

As you may be aware, PMRA released their proposed special review decision for Chlorothalonil (PSRD2022-01) yesterday afternoon (February 10th, 2022). The Special Review was triggered in 2018 from 2016 European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) reports, which ultimately led to the EU prohibiting all uses of chlorothalonil for plant protection uses in 2019 with a last use date of May 20, 2020. Numerous (new to PMRA) studies from the 2016 EFSA report were used in this special review decision for both dietary and environmental considerations which were not used in the previous cyclical re-evaluation (RVD2018-11). Common products containing chlorothalonil include Bravo, Daconil, and Echo among others listed in Appendix I on page 20 of the attached report.

Proposed outcome: Cancellation of all outdoor and food uses. Revocation of all MRLs. Use on Greenhouse Ornamentals is proposed to remain for facilities with closed recirculation systems.

Decision Factors + Highlights from the review:

  • Food (Dietary) risks are based off of exposure to chlorothalonil through current use patterns AND drinking water (the major contributor). Current use patterns alone are deemed acceptable, however, combined effects are deemed unacceptable for all . This is for all age groups.
    • Numerous metabolites and breakdown products identified, limited knowledge on these products. There is thought that there are still more unknown products in existence.
    • Most evidence suggests chlorothalonil metabolites to not be genotoxic.
  • Environmental effects have been deemed unacceptable for aquatic organisms for all outdoor uses.  
  • Runoff is a major factor to exposure, Vertical filter strips deemed unlikely to be effective (ineffective). Pulse exposure events are largely to blame following weather events.
  • Also concern on environmental fate and endpoints.
  • If some uses are preserved from the special review decision, Buffer zones to reduce spray drift between 1 – 120 m for ground applications (depending on application method) and 15-800 meters for aerial applications were found to be acceptable and are expected to be implemented with exception to turf (which no buffer zone was deemed acceptable).
  • Effects on pollinators was not review as aquatic organisms were the focus of environmental impacts in this review, the door has been left open for a future review on honeybees / pollinators in the future should some outdoor uses remain.

An attached highlighted copy of the Proposed Special Review Decision is included. Pages 1 and 2, as well as sections 4.11, 4.1.3, 4.1.4, 4.1.5, 4.2, 4.2.1, 4.2.2, 4.2.3, 6.0, and 7.0 should be reviewed. In addition, a summary of the information can be found at the following webpage: https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/consumer-product-safety/pesticides-pest-management/public/consultations/proposed-special-review-decision/2022/chlorothalonil/document.html

Public consultation for this proposed special review decision  will close on March 27th 2022. May 11, 2022. Growers groups, associations, stakeholders, and others interested in commenting on this decision are encouraged to do so by contacting PMRA publications, or visiting the following link. Comments may be considered for preserving some uses according to their scientific merit and relevance to the risk assessment, and will be included in the final special review decision document to be released at a later date in the future. 

https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/corporate/contact-us/pest-management-regulatory-agency-publications.html

It is critical to consider 1) which crops and uses depend solely upon chlorothalonil for pest control and currently have no effective alternatives and 2) Which crops and uses depend upon chlorothalonil but that have alternatives that may be less effective or may be cost-prohibitive.

The OGSA in partnership with the GCSAA have drafted and submitted this comment on behalf of the association and its members. 

We invite anyone who wishes to join the conversation to use this template to add their voice to the conversation. 

Where possible, please copy Josh Mosiondz on responses. 

Josh Mosiondz 
Provincial Minor Use Coordinator
Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food & Rural Affairs

1 Stone Road West, 1st Floor NW
Guelph, ON, N1G 4Y2

joshua.mosiondz@ontario.ca
 

 

ECONOMIC IMPACT OF GOLF IN CANADA 2019 REPORT

 

CHANGES TO ON Reg. 63/09

April 29, 2020

In such unprecedented times as these, it is nice to be able to deliver some good news.   The required public meeting component has been removed from O. Reg. 63/09.

This comes after a great deal of work, both by our NAGA – Ontario, (We are golf) group at Queen’s Park, OGSA Directors and many others, and displays the collaboration within our industry from all the parties involved.

In addition to the removal of the public meeting requirement there are some minor changes in the regulation that you may wish to review, specifically sections 78 and 79 of the act.  While section 78 has not changed, there are changes to section 79.   Both sections deal with the posting of pesticide application signs.

Please refer to the attached document for more detail on these changes:

PDF

The regulation in its entirety can be found on the government website here:

https://www.ontario.ca/laws/regulation/090063

 

THE OGSA'S REQUEST TO PREMIER FORD REGARDING COVID 19

 

FOLLOW UP LETTER FOR MEMBERS OF PROVINCIAL PARLIAMENT

 

WE ARE GOLF GROUP REPRESENTING ONTARIO, ATTEND QUEEN'S PARK ON NATIONAL GOLF DAY - MAY 1, 2019

 

 

OGSA AND NGCOA MET WITH TED ARNOTT, MPP, WELLINGTON-HALTON HILLS - AUGUST 30th 2017 TO DISCUSS PUBLIC MEETINGS, NOTIFICATION PROECESS, and MINIMUM WAGE INCREASES

 


 

NAGA FAQ DOCUMENT FOR GOLF - RE PESTICIDE USE ON GOLF COURSES

 
 

 

IPM INFORMATION/UPDATES 
 
 
 
 

 

 
NAGA'S ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY OF GOLF IN CANADA